NBA attempts to deport flopping

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Flopping in the NBA can best be described in one word: GONE.

The NBA’s anti-doping policy has been in effect since 1983. Steroids weren’t added to the list of banned substances until 1999. Any sort of performance enhancement like these are serious no-nos, but never did I see this coming: an article of business that necessitates a discussion on the permanent dismissal of…flopping?

I say I never saw this coming because I lack faith in the NBA’s judicial department, and anyway, players should have more respect for themselves, not to mention the sport they’re getting paid to play. Different topic for a different day, but long story paraphrased, I thought the NBA would just let the flopping go unchallenged, but that was apparently inaccurate. An anti-flopping policy placing penalties and then fines (after the first offense) on players that try to spit on their own image has been employed. After the first warning, violators will be subject to fines in increments of $5,000. After the fifth flop, the fine becomes $30,000.

This policy should take care of the problem… and quickly. Might I add that I hope to see consistency with this policy and may I suggest an addendum to the policy: referees must eliminate the phenomena commonly referred to as the “grey area” when it comes to ringing up the players. You see anything that resembles trickery, blow the whistle and restore order immediately. NBA referees should take offense to NBA players’ many attempts to fool them. The players are making the refs seem inadequate.

Flopping has been a part of the game since the introduction of the “charge.” It’s common knowledge among basketball gamers; I remember it like it was today. Before taking a full-contact charge in basketball practice, Coach would place wrestling mats under the basket. The mats weren’t around very long. Being taught this way instilled a flop-first mentality. To soften the blow, players tend to move with the oncoming traffic, and this, I say, is a flop. Certainly not every charge is a flop, I’m merely stating that in most situations, a bit of acting, not a legit basketball play/move, is occurring.

Now it seems NBA players have stepped outside of the prohibited area only to commence with an urge to over-emote. When I see one of these “men” fall to their knees in what appears to be the worst bit of pain imaginable because another “man” lightly brushed his shoulder, I feel embarrassed… for everybody. The fans, the players, the entire NBA organization. This is one of my many problems with the game today.

Cheating is only “allowed” in fĂștbol. Watching these idiotic acts of gamesmanship is not a rarity in what most North Americans call “soccer”; the antics are just hilarious. Said antics also smear their respective sport with greasy, hard-to-remove stains. As a strong soccer supporter, I’ve sat and listened to a lot of ballyhoo when it comes to “the beautiful game.” A majority of the rabble-rousers are turned off by the flopping and label soccer a “sissy” sport. That stain is going to be hard to get out. NBA players seem to be playing with the same fire that has the game of fĂștbol riddled with disgrace and, hopefully, this new policy will extinguish said flame before it scorches the league.

The flop has overstayed its welcome in the NBA. The ideal situation would be a universal ban on flopping. In competition, such displays should not exist. I don’t see sports as entertainment. It’s a competition. For men, not boys. The jesting is to be done on the playground – not on the pitch and not on the basketball court.

A respectful message to NBA players:

1. Save your money.

2. Don’t flop.


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 NBA attempts to deport flopping

Marcus Middleton

Born, but not raised, in Goldsboro, North Carolina, this slender, 6"2 hoops writer has been dedicated to the game for as long as he can remember (and his memory serves him well). Not just the game itself, but how the image of the league (and of course, the players) is perceived by both the fans and the haters breathes life into his prose. There's much to say about how the game is perceived today as opposed to the good ol' days when egos and narcissistic, megalomaniacal behavior were the exception rather than the rule.
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